ANGER MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

While anger is a strong emotional signal to us that some pressing problem must be addressed, it is also the driving force behind arguments and aggressive behavior.  Reducing the incidence of ineffective handling of anger is the major objective of EAC’s Anger Management Program

EAC’s Anger Management Program offers an effective sentencing alternative for the Court, and serves Nassau County, Brooklyn, Queens and Manhattan. It provides a comprehensive program to address aggressive behavior resulting from conflict related offenses. The Anger Management Program targets defendants who have been charged with conflict related offenses with minimal or no prior criminal records through involvement in a program of brief behavioral training intervention.

The goal of the program is to provide the participants with the tools necessary to alter their behaviors in order to prevent anger precipitated offenses in the future. In addition, the victims involved in these offenses have the comfort of knowing that positive and responsible steps have been taken by the Court system in response to these crimes. The program helps to decrease the recurring costs of personal and property damage resulting from these crimes, and ultimately decrease the costs of police, courts, and corrections to prosecute the offenders.

The Anger Management Program is a six-hour course designed to deter participants from engaging in future aggressive or violent behavior by impressing upon them the consequences of such behavior to the victim and themselves.  The curriculum is extremely diversified.  Training techniques include problem solving, social skills training and behavior reversal.  In addition, a social worker will individually screen and assess each participant to determine levels of aggressive and associated behavioral disorders requiring more intensive professional evaluation and intervention.  Referrals for continuing therapy are made where appropriate.

The Anger Management Program provides participants with information they can use to rethink their approach to confrontational situations.

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